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Document Drop: Baruch Living Wage Survey
Daily Politics / New York Daily News
Celeste Katz

May 27, 2011
View the Original Article


It obviously got a little hectic this week, what with NY-26 and all, but after the jump is a survey of 1,200 New Yorkers from Baruch College Survey Research on wages and sick days.

Among the survey's findings, New Yorkers overwhelmingly support: Raising the minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $10 by 2012 with a COLA; requiring employers to give workers five sick days a year; "living wage" legislation requiring employers on taxpayer-subsidized projects to pay $10 an hour.

Andrew Brent, a spokesman for Mayor Bloomberg, who says the legislation will drive away employers, responds: "Everyone, including opponents of living wage legislation, supports the goal of higher wages for low-skilled workers. But if the question asked whether or not one favored modest wage gains among a handful of low-skilled workers at the cost of thousands of low-skilled jobs, I suspect you’d get a much different result."

Update: Dan Morris, a spokesman for Living Wage NYC/RWDSU, responds: "If the administration supports the goal of higher wages for low-skilled workers, where is their plan to accomplish that goal? They released a report earlier this week admitting that their jobs programs have no “over-arching city goal or mission.” Yikes! No wonder low-wage workers and the unemployed in this city continue to struggle. As for the living wage bill, it's based on pragmatic policy that's been proven to boost wages for workers in major cities like Los Angeles without harming business growth or economic development. None of the existing living wage laws, many of them passed years ago, have been repealed. That's because these laws work. The track record of success cannot be denied."

Report on Minimum Wage, Paid Sick Days, and Living Wages (data from Baruch College Survey of 1200 New Yorkers)