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City Council Will Hold "Living Wage" Hearing
New York Daily News
Celeste Katz

October 17, 2011
View the Original Article


Amid mounting pressure, City Council Speaker Christine Quinn announced today that she would allow a public hearing into the controversial "living wage" bill.

Our Reuven Blau reports:

“That public hearing I think will help inform everyone in the process,” she told reporters. “Those who have a position, and those like myself, who have yet to take a position.”

The meeting is scheduled for Nov. 22.

Quinn has done her best to dodge taking a stance the politically charged proposal, which would require city-subsidized companies to pay workers $10 an hour plus benefits, up from the current $7.25 minimum wage.

Mayor Bloomberg is steadfastly opposed to the bill, contending that it will destroy as many as 13,000 jobs if enacted.

Quinn, a mayoral candidate in 2013, has tried to avoid even talking about the legislation: “You’re like a dog with a bone,” she told a News reporter who questioned her on the subject last week.

The bill has strong union support but is vehemently opposed by business leaders.

In reply to those issues, the bill’s backers have drafted a watered down version of the legislation. Those proposed amendments restrict the number of firms that would be covered by the new salary regulations.

The union supporters welcomed Quinn’s announcement. “A large grassroots movement to pass this legislation is growing stronger every day, while the opposition looks increasingly weak and irrelevant,” said Dan Morris, a spokesman for the Living Wage NYC Coalition.

A hearing may be as far the bill goes: Quinn nixed a similarly controversial bill requiring paid sick leave days after first green-lighting a hearing on it.